3.5-inch floppy disk
3M LCD Projection Panel
5.25-inch floppy disk
Apple graphics tablet
Apple Newton MessagePad 120
Asus P65UP5 W/ C/P6ND
Casio Cassiopeia E-125 G
Cassette recorder
Cisco 800 Series Router
Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC
Consul, the educated monkey
CTX Beamer
D-link Wireless USB Adapter
Freecom Classic CD-Rom
Freecom Portable CD-RW
Hard Disk Drive
Iomega Zip 100
iPad
iPod
Lerncomputer LC80
Lingvo C pen
Mega Image 55cx
Okto-Power (power supply unit)
Olympus Camedia C-410 L
Palm 3COM III
Plasmon CDR 4220
Program cassettes of TIMEX SINCLAIR 1000
PSION SERIE 3
Punched cards
Quantum Bigfoot hard drive
REISS Slide Rule
Sun GWV Speaker Box
Tento TV Set
TrackMan Wheel
WOERLTRONIC acoustic coupler dataphone s21d-2





Punched cards
IBM, 1964
A punch card or punched card (or punchcard or Hollerith card or IBM card), is a piece of stiff paper that contains digital information represented by the presence or absence of holes in predefined positions.
Here are IBM punched cards in IBM 80 column format. Designed in 1928, they had rectangular holes, 80 columns with 12 punch locations each, one character to each column. Card size was exactly 7-3/8 inch by 3-1/4 inch (187.325 by 82.55 mm). The cards were made of smooth stock, 0.007 inch (0.178 mm) thick. There are about 143 cards to the inch. In 1964, IBM changed from square to round corners.
The lower ten positions represented (from top to bottom) the digits 0 through 9. The top two positions of a column were called zone punches, 12 (top) and 11. Originally only numeric information was coded, with 1 punch per column indicating the digit. Signs could be added to a field by overpunching the least significant digit with a zone punch: 12 for plus and 11 for minus. Zone punches had other uses in processing as well, such as indicating a master record.