3.5-inch floppy disk
3M LCD Projection Panel
5.25-inch floppy disk
Apple graphics tablet
Apple Newton MessagePad 120
Asus P65UP5 W/ C/P6ND
Casio Cassiopeia E-125 G
Cassette recorder
Cisco 800 Series Router
Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC
Consul, the educated monkey
CTX Beamer
D-link Wireless USB Adapter
Freecom Classic CD-Rom
Freecom Portable CD-RW
Hard Disk Drive
Iomega Zip 100
Lerncomputer LC80
Lingvo C pen
Mega Image 55cx
Okto-Power (power supply unit)
Olympus Camedia C-410 L
Plasmon CDR 4220
Program cassettes of TIMEX SINCLAIR 1000
Punched cards
Quantum Bigfoot hard drive
REISS Slide Rule
Sun GWV Speaker Box
Tento TV Set
TrackMan Wheel
WOERLTRONIC acoustic coupler dataphone s21d-2

5.25-inch floppy disk
Format: 5.25-inch
A floppy disk is a data storage medium that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible ("floppy") magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell.
In 1975, Burroughs' plant in Glenrothes developed a prototype 5.25-inch drive, stimulated both by the need to overcome the larger 8-inch floppy's asymmetric expansion properties with changing humidity, and to reflect the knowledge that IBM's audio recording products division was demonstrating a dictation machine using 5.25-inch drive.
In 1976 two of Shugart Associates's employees, Jim Adkisson and Don Massaro, were approached by An Wang of Wang Laboratories, who felt that the 8-inch format was simply too large for the desktop word processing machines he was developing at the time. After meeting in a bar in Boston, Adkisson asked Wang what size he thought the disks should be, and Wang pointed to a napkin and said "about that size". Adkisson took the napkin back to California, found it to be 5.25-inch wide, and developed a new drive of this size storing 98.5 KB later increased to 110 KB by adding 5 tracks. This is believed to be the first standard computer medium that was not promulgated by IBM.